Border Terrier Health

Border Terrier Breed Profile

Average Weight:
Male – 6 – 7kg (13 – 15.5lbs).
Female – 5 – 6.5kg (11 – 14lbs).

Average Height:
Male – 26 - 31cm (10.5 - 12in).
Female – 25 – 28cm (10 - 11in).

Coat:
Double coat – wiry, close outer coat with a short, dense undercoat.

Average Life Span:
13 – 16 years.

Average Litter Size:
 4 – 7 puppies.

Border Terrier Fast Facts

Ease To Train
Exercise Needs
Grooming Frequency
Energy Level
Protective Instincts
Behaviour Around Children
Relationship With Other Pets
Loyalty To Owner
Ease To Train
Some dogs are easy to train while others require more effort. General breed factors are taken into consideration to determine how easy you should find it to train your dog. On the scale, a 1 indicates that your dog will be difficult to train while a 10 indicates that your dog should be easy to train.

Exercise Needs
Dogs vary greatly in the amount of exercise they need on a daily basis. Some may need long, vigorous walks while a walk around the block will be sufficient for some. A score towards the lower end of the scale means that your dog requires little exercise while a score towards 5 indicates that they have high exercise needs.

Grooming Frequency
Depending on your dog’s coat, the grooming frequency will vary. Some will need brushing every day while others can be groomed once a week. On this scale, a 1 shows that a dog needs very little grooming while a 5 shows they require plenty of upkeep.

Energy Level
Some breeds have incredibly high energy levels and find it difficult to rest while others prefer sleeping for large parts of the day. A score of 1 on the scale indicates the dog has a low energy level while a 5 shows they have extremely high levels of energy.

Protective Instincts
Many dogs have protective instincts and may act wary around strangers while others are much more friendly and accepting. A score of 1 indicates that your dog is unlikely to react to strangers while a score of 5 shows that your dog is likely to be wary.

Behaviour Around Children
Many dogs that are reared and socialised around children understand how to interact with them but some breeds are completely unsuitable to have around children. On this scale, a score of 1 shows that a breed is not good around children while a score of 5 shows they are perfectly compatible.

Relationship With Other Pets
Stereotypically dogs don’t get on with other pets but often this is not the case; many dogs enjoy the company of other animals. A score of 1 shows that it is not a good idea to mix a breed with other pets while a 5 indicates they tend to get on well with other animals.

Loyalty To Owner
Most dogs are extremely loyal to their owners and family, although there are a few that are quite independent. A low score of 1 indicates that a breed does not have a strong sense of loyalty while a score of 5 shows that they are extremely loyal.
This breed is generally very healthy but there are some Border Terrier health problems.  They can suffer from the canine problem of hip dysplasia as well as juvenile cataracts, which affect dogs below the age of five.  Hip dysplasia is a malformation of the hip joint which often prevents a dog from walking correctly.  It can cause a lot of pain and commonly results in arthritis.  While these are relatively minor, there are some Border Terrier health problems that are more severe.

One major Border Terrier health problem that is relatively new is Canine Epileptoid Cramping Syndrome (CECS), also known as Spike’s Disease.   It is a hereditary disease that is still being investigated by scientists but it is known to be close to canine epilepsy.  Symptoms of CECS can include cramping, staggering, dizziness and muscle contractions that can last for a few seconds or several minutes, after which your Border Terrier’s health will return to normal.  If you suspect that your dog has this syndrome you should seek a professional opinion as soon as possible.

Another common Border Terrier health problem is Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA).  It is a condition that sees the gradual degeneration of the retina.  PRA can take hold quickly or progress over a longer period, but you will see your dog progressively lose its vision, first at night time and then during the day.  This disease can progress to a stage where your Border Terrier will become completely blind, so it can be a large Border Terrier health problem.

Border Terrier Quick Links

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