Bernese Mountain Dog Grooming

Bernese Mountain Dog Breed Profile

Average Weight:
Male – 40 – 44kg (88 – 97lbs).
Female – 40 – 44kg (88 – 97lbs).

Average Height:
Male – 64 – 70cm (25 – 28in).
Female – 58 – 66cm (23 – 26in).

Coat:
Thick, soft, medium length coat.

Average Life Span:
7 – 10 years.

Average Litter Size:
6 – 8 puppies.

Bernese Mountain Dog Fast Facts

Ease To Train
Exercise Needs
Grooming Frequency
Energy Level
Protective Instincts
Behaviour Around Children
Relationship With Other Pets
Loyalty To Owner
Ease To Train
Some dogs are easy to train while others require more effort. General breed factors are taken into consideration to determine how easy you should find it to train your dog. On the scale, a 1 indicates that your dog will be difficult to train while a 10 indicates that your dog should be easy to train.

Exercise Needs
Dogs vary greatly in the amount of exercise they need on a daily basis. Some may need long, vigorous walks while a walk around the block will be sufficient for some. A score towards the lower end of the scale means that your dog requires little exercise while a score towards 5 indicates that they have high exercise needs.

Grooming Frequency
Depending on your dog’s coat, the grooming frequency will vary. Some will need brushing every day while others can be groomed once a week. On this scale, a 1 shows that a dog needs very little grooming while a 5 shows they require plenty of upkeep.

Energy Level
Some breeds have incredibly high energy levels and find it difficult to rest while others prefer sleeping for large parts of the day. A score of 1 on the scale indicates the dog has a low energy level while a 5 shows they have extremely high levels of energy.

Protective Instincts
Many dogs have protective instincts and may act wary around strangers while others are much more friendly and accepting. A score of 1 indicates that your dog is unlikely to react to strangers while a score of 5 shows that your dog is likely to be wary.

Behaviour Around Children
Many dogs that are reared and socialised around children understand how to interact with them but some breeds are completely unsuitable to have around children. On this scale, a score of 1 shows that a breed is not good around children while a score of 5 shows they are perfectly compatible.

Relationship With Other Pets
Stereotypically dogs don’t get on with other pets but often this is not the case; many dogs enjoy the company of other animals. A score of 1 shows that it is not a good idea to mix a breed with other pets while a 5 indicates they tend to get on well with other animals.

Loyalty To Owner
Most dogs are extremely loyal to their owners and family, although there are a few that are quite independent. A low score of 1 indicates that a breed does not have a strong sense of loyalty while a score of 5 shows that they are extremely loyal.
Starting Bernese Mountain Dog grooming during puppyhood acquaints the animal with the various aspects of handling and provides a bonding experience between master and dog. Introducing a youngster to the process also prevents difficulties when attempting to handle a large adult dog. Grooming enhances the health of the dog by enabling the owner to monitor the condition of the coat, skin, eyes, ears and feet. By incorporating routine brushing and skin inspections, owners may detect abnormalities early, as all the fur easily hides irritations, lesions or lumps. Additionally, Bernese Mountain Dog grooming includes preventing infestations, as the animal’s thick coat is a prime location for harbouring fleas or ticks.

Any Bernese Mountain Dog grooming involves dealing with the glossy, lustrous coat, which may be wavy or straight. The length of the fur lends itself to attracting debris during outdoor romps and without routine attention, the thick undercoat becomes prone to matting. Regular maintenance includes weekly to daily brushing to ensure the dog‘s optimal appearance. Routine brushing also improves the animal’s comfort by helping to eliminate heavy shedding, which occurs during the spring and fall. Unless the Bernese is exposed to something particularly unpleasant, bathing as part of the Bernese Mountain Dog grooming process needs only occur every three months or so.

Misting the coat with a conditioning solution prior to brushing makes Bernese Mountain Dog grooming a more enjoyable experience for the animal and owner, as the solution assists in untangling the long locks of fur. Many employ this practice after bathing to prevent coat damage. Blow drying the hair while brushing, after an occasional bath, ensures the coat dries evenly without matting or tangling and adds to the healthy, shiny appearance. Bernese Mountain Dog grooming should also include weekly ear inspections, alerting owners to possible problems.

Many owners implement regular dental care as part of Bernese Mountain Dog grooming. Special toothbrushes and toothpaste are available to owners who choose to brush the dog’s teeth anywhere from weekly to daily. Owners typically also check the condition of the animal’s feet. The nails may wear down naturally from constant outdoor activity or may require monthly trimming. Nail trimming is easily accomplished by the owner using a rotary sanding tool or a pair of nail clippers. A professional groomer may also trim the nails or instruct owners how to safely accomplish this task. Foot care during Bernese Mountain Dog grooming also includes routinely checking the pads and between the toes for possible infection or irritation.

Bernese Mountain Dog Quick Links

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