Pomeranian

Pomeranian Breed Profile

Average Weight:
Male – 1.5 – 3kg (3 – 7lbs).
Female – 1.5 – 3kg (3 – 7lbs).

Average Height:
Male – 22 – 28cm (8.5 – 11in).
Female – 22 – 28cm (8.5 – 11in).

Coat:
Double coat – long straight outer coat and soft, thick undercoat.

Average Life Span:
13 – 15 years.

Average Litter Size:
2 – 4 puppies.

Pomeranian Fast Facts

Ease To Train
Exercise Needs
Grooming Frequency
Energy Level
Protective Instincts
Behaviour Around Children
Relationship With Other Pets
Loyalty To Owner
Ease To Train
Some dogs are easy to train while others require more effort. General breed factors are taken into consideration to determine how easy you should find it to train your dog. On the scale, a 1 indicates that your dog will be difficult to train while a 10 indicates that your dog should be easy to train.

Exercise Needs
Dogs vary greatly in the amount of exercise they need on a daily basis. Some may need long, vigorous walks while a walk around the block will be sufficient for some. A score towards the lower end of the scale means that your dog requires little exercise while a score towards 5 indicates that they have high exercise needs.

Grooming Frequency
Depending on your dog’s coat, the grooming frequency will vary. Some will need brushing every day while others can be groomed once a week. On this scale, a 1 shows that a dog needs very little grooming while a 5 shows they require plenty of upkeep.

Energy Level
Some breeds have incredibly high energy levels and find it difficult to rest while others prefer sleeping for large parts of the day. A score of 1 on the scale indicates the dog has a low energy level while a 5 shows they have extremely high levels of energy.

Protective Instincts
Many dogs have protective instincts and may act wary around strangers while others are much more friendly and accepting. A score of 1 indicates that your dog is unlikely to react to strangers while a score of 5 shows that your dog is likely to be wary.

Behaviour Around Children
Many dogs that are reared and socialised around children understand how to interact with them but some breeds are completely unsuitable to have around children. On this scale, a score of 1 shows that a breed is not good around children while a score of 5 shows they are perfectly compatible.

Relationship With Other Pets
Stereotypically dogs don’t get on with other pets but often this is not the case; many dogs enjoy the company of other animals. A score of 1 shows that it is not a good idea to mix a breed with other pets while a 5 indicates they tend to get on well with other animals.

Loyalty To Owner
Most dogs are extremely loyal to their owners and family, although there are a few that are quite independent. A low score of 1 indicates that a breed does not have a strong sense of loyalty while a score of 5 shows that they are extremely loyal.
The Pomeranian breed has an extremely distinctive appearance and certainly can’t be missed due to their abundance of fur and confident personality.  They are equally at home as a pet or as a competitor, making them extremely versatile too.  Poms are very outgoing, confident dogs that have a high degree of intelligence and love to be involved in everything their family does.  Despite their tiny stature, they have an incredible energy level that allows them to compete as a show dog and keep up with the everyday activities of family life.  While they don’t need a great deal of exercise, usually just two short walks a day, they are capable of walking for miles if it involves just being with their family.  This should not, however, be deemed as over-dependence; instead they just require a suitable level of attention and if it cannot be given they may result to destructive behaviour.  On the other hand, too much attention can lead to your Pomeranian being demanding and overly spoilt.

This makes training your Pomeranian an important task, although it should be relatively easy as they are an intelligent breed and have a willingness to learn.  Obedience training will remove any thoughts your Pom had that it was in charge, while other training should be done using a positive approach.  As with other members of the toy breed group, house training can be a challenge but this is not your dogs fault – just persevere and they will learn.  Socialising is another important aspect of training this breed, particularly when young children are involved.  While generally quite confident, Pomeranians can become nervous around young children so time spent with them will increase their confidence.

One habit that you may find difficult to train your Pomeranian out of is barking when they sense danger or someone unfamiliar.  While this can make for a good watchdog, it can also be annoying when it occurs every time someone comes to the door.  Training from a young age can certainly reduce the amount your dog barks, although it may be more difficult to stop it completely.  When feeding your Pom it is best to provide several small meals a day as they may take time to digest larger meals.  Unsurprisingly, the Pomeranian requires a great deal of grooming due to their profuse coat.  Brushing several times a week will help the coat look its best, although more regular attention is required during the shedding period.  This breed is susceptible to tear stains around the eye so cleaning these on a regular basis will help improve your Pomeranian’s look.

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